Suggestions for Further Reading

These books are suggested for supplementary reading if it so happens that you have access to them. They are not approved nor officially supplied by the War Department. They have been selected because they give additional information and represent different points of view.

When Demobilization Day Comes. NO. 14 of Planning Pamphlets published by National Planning Association, 800 Twenty-first Street, N. W., Washington, D.C (July 1942).

Jobs and Security for Tomorrow. By Maxwell S. Stewart. No. 84 of Public Affairs Pamphlets published by Public Affairs Committee, 30 Rockefeller Plaza’, New York 20, N.Y. (1943) ,

When I Get Out Will I Find a Job? By Maxwell S. Stewart. No. 86 of Public Affairs Pamphlets published by Public Affairs Committee 0943).

Postwar Re-Employment: The Magnitude of the Problem. By Karl T. Schlotterbeck. Published by Brookings Institution, 722 Jackson Place, N.W., Washington 6, D.C. (1943).

Absorbing the Total Labor Supply. By Emerson P. Schmidt. Bulletin No. 5 of Post-War Readjustments published by Chamber of Commerce of the United States of America, 1615 H Street, N.W., Washington, D.C. (1943).

Employment of Men and Women Discharged from Military Service. Report of the Department of Manufacture, Chamber of Commerce of the United States of America (February 1944)

Postwar Employment Opportunities. Published by National Industrial Conference Board, 247 Park Avenue, New York 17, N.Y. (1944).

As We Win. Report No. I of the Department of Research and Education, CIO Postwar Planning Committee, 718 Jackson Place, N.W., Washington 6, D.C. (1944).

Post-War Program. Published by Postwar Planning Commit-tee of the American Federation of Labor, got Massachusetts Avenue, N.W., Washington, D.C. (1943).

Employment after the War. By John H. G. Pierson. Published by Postwar Planning Committee of the American Federation of Labor (1943).

War and Postwar Adjustment Policies. By Bernard M. Baruch and John M. Hancock. Published by American Council on Public Affairs, 2153 Florida Avenue, N.W., Washington, D.C. (1944).