Member News

AHA Staff, April 2013

AHA members are encouraged to submit news about their careers, including prizes, promotions, honors, tenure, and new jobs. If you have an announcement that you would like to publish, please send it to Perspectives on History, with the subject line, "Member News."

Selcuk Esenbel, Bogazici University, Istanbul, Turkey, is the recipient of a George Foster Research Award, given by the Alexander von Humboldt Foundation, after being nominated for this award by Dr. Dominic Sachsenmaier, Jacobs University, Bremen, Germany. The award is conferred in recognition of lifetime achievements in research. In addition, the awardee is invited to carry out research projects of her own choice in cooperation with specialist colleagues in Germany.

Two AHA members are among the recently announced finalists for the 2013 George Washington Book Prize, sponsored by Washington College. Eliga H. Gould's Among the Powers of the Earth: The American Revolution and the Making of a New World Empire (Harvard Univ. Press) and Cynthia A. Kierner's Martha Jefferson Randolph, Daughter of Monticello: Her Life and Times (Univ. of North Carolina Press) were among the nominees for the prize, which honors a single recent work on Washington or his times and carries an award of $50,000.

Brian McCook has received the Oskar Halecki Award, given by the Polish-American Historical Association for an important book or monograph on the Polish experience in the United States, for Borders of Integration: Polish Migrants in Germany and the United States, 1870–1924 (Ohio Univ. Press). Borders of Integration compares Polish immigrant miners in Pennsylvania in the United States and in the Ruhr Valley in Germany. McCook challenges the views that immigrants assimilated into their host societies. He is an associate dean at Manchester Metropolitan University.

Jörg Muth's book Command Culture: Officer Education in the U.S. Army and the German Armed Forces, 1901–1940, and the Consequences for World War II (Univ. of North Texas Press) was recently selected by General James F. Amos, commandant of the United States Marine Corps, for his professional reading list. Command Culture has become required reading for all senior enlisted men and all intermediate officer ranks of the Marine Corps. Muth's book is now one of the few titles that have made it onto the reading lists of both the Marine Corps commandant and the US Army chief of staff. In addition, Command Culture received the prestigious Distinguished Writing Award from the Army Historical Foundation and will soon be available as a paperback.

Peopling of the Americas, Currents, Canoes, and DNA (Nova Science Publishers, 2011) by Barbara Bennett Peterson (Univ. of Hawaii) explains the ethnic origins of Native Americans using recent genetic studies and DNA tracings. Native Americans' ancestors crossed both the Pacific and the Atlantic oceans migrating from Asia, Southeast Asia, South Asia, Oceania, and Europe to create cultural blends in the New World. For more information on this important book for Native American scholars and students, go to novapublishers.com.