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From the In Memoriam column in the May 1998 Perspectives

Fredrick Aandahl (1919-97)

David W. Hirst, May 1998

Fredrick Aandahl died on December 25, 1997, at the age of 78, in Princeton, New Jersey, following a long illness.

Born in Portland, Oregon, he received his BA from Reed College in 1941 and his MA and PhD from Princeton University in 1955. He served as instructor in history at Bowdoin College for the academic year 1948-49 and as an associate editor of the Papers of Thomas Jefferson at Princeton University from 1954 to 1956.

For the following year, he served with the American Army of Occupation in Germany. During his long career at the United States Department of State, he served as editor of the Foreign Relations Series, deputy director of the Office of Historian, and associate editor of documents on German foreign policy. He was also a member of the National Historical Publications and Records Commission.

On retirement in 1979 from the Department of State, he joined the staff of the Papers of Woodrow Wilson at Princeton University as an associate editor, making significant contributions to 11 volumes. During a second retirement, he continued to work on special research projects for the papers for several years.

Aandahl was a dedicated and valuable member of the various staffs which his presence graced. Reserved by nature, wise in counsel sought, he possessed a wry and incisive sense of humor, lightening the impact of life's inanities; a colleague to admire, a friend to cherish.

He is survived by his wife, Irma Roald; a stepson, Roald Lee Aandahl of Encinitas, California; a stepdaughter, Jorjean Hyden of Wayne, Pennsylvania; and several step-grandchildren.

He was a member of the American Historical Association, the Association for Documentary Editing, the American Scandinavian Foundation, the Oregon Historical Society, and the Nassau Club of Princeton.

Interment was private; a memorial service was held in Princeton University Chapel on January 24, 1998.

—David W. Hirst
Princeton University