From the 125th Annual Meeting column of the November 2010 issue of Perspectives on History

Tours of Historic Boston Arranged by the Local Arrangements Committee

AHA Staff, November 2010

Preregistration is highly recommended for the following tours available at the 125th Annual Meeting. Tour tickets are non-refundable and cannot be exchanged. Call (508) 743-0510 to add tickets to an existing registration. Tour participants must be registered for the AHA meeting. Tours will meet at the locations specified below. Please arrive approximately 15 minutes before the scheduled departure time.

If you have questions about accessibility for tours, please contact aha@historians.org by December 1 and someone will contact you to determine specific needs.

Tour 1: The Peabody Essex Museum and Historic Salem, Friday, January 7, 9:00 a.m.–4:00 p.m. Meet in the Hynes Convention Center, Room 108 at 9:00 a.m. to take the train to the historic port city of Salem. This tour will center on a visit to the Peabody Essex Museum and its remarkable collection of Asian art. Limit: 20 people; fee: $25 (includes includes round-trip train fare to Salem).

Tour 2: The Freedom Trail, Friday, January 7, 10:00 a.m.–1:00 p.m. Meet in the Hynes Convention Center, Room 108 at 10:00 a.m. for the walking tour, which will introduce visitors to some of the highlights of the city’s freedom trail. Focusing on Beacon Hill and downtown Boston, we will explore aspects of the city’s revolutionary-era history and the emergence of its free black community. Limit: 20 people; fee: $10.

Tour 3: The Schlesinger Library on the History of Women in America, Friday, January 7, 2:00–6:00 p.m. Meet in the Hynes Convention Center, Room 108 at 2:00 p.m. to take the subway to the Schlesinger’s Library, whose unique holdings include thousands of manuscript records of organizations important to the lives of women in the United States, including photographs, books, periodicals, ephemera, oral histories, audiovisual materials, and one of the world’s most significant culinary collections. Limit: 15 people; fee: $10 (includes subway fare).

Tour 4: Boston’s North End, Friday, January 7, 2:00–4:00 p.m. Meet in the Hynes Convention Center, Room 108 at 2:00 p.m. for the walking tour which includes the Paul Revere House and the Old North Church. This waterfront neighborhood evolved into a vibrant immigrant enclave. This tour will introduce visitors to the ethnic history of the North End as well as its modern-day, post-Big Dig transformation. Limit: 15 people; fee: $10.

Tour 5: Lowell and the Industrial Revolution in America, Saturday, January 8, 9:00 a.m.–3:00 p.m. Meet in the Hynes Convention Center, Room 108 at 9:00 a.m. to take the train to Lowell, which commemorates the early story of America’s Industrial Revolution. The park offers visitors an in-depth look into the past that brought the nineteenth-century textile industry to tap the waterpower of the Merrimack River while also revealing cultural connections to the present and visions for the future. Limit: 20 people; fee: $20 (includes round-trip train fare).

Tour 6: The Black Heritage Trail, Saturday, January 8, 10:00 a.m.–12:00 p.m. Meet in the Hynes Convention Center, Room 108 at 10:00 a.m. for the walking tour, which will explore the National Park Service; Museum of African American History trail through Beacon Hill featuring highlights of the free black community in antebellum Boston, including the African Meeting House. Led by Horace Seldon, National Park Service. Limit: 20 people; fee: $10.

Tour 7: Land Making on Boston’s Central Waterfront, Saturday, January 8, 11:00 a.m.–1:00 p.m. Meet in the Hynes Convention Center, Room 108 at 11:00 a.m. for this walking tour, guided by Nancy Seasholes, a historian of land making and city expansion in Boston. This tour will trace the filling of Boston’s central waterfront areas from its start in the 1660s to the 1870s when it was completed. The walk will start with areas filled in the seventeenth century and proceed chronologically through the large commercial and civic land making projects of the nineteenth century. Limit: 15 people; fee: $10.

Tour 8: Adams National Historical Park, Saturday, January 8, 1:00–5:00 p.m. Meet in the Hynes Convention Center, Room 108 at 1:00 p.m. to take the subway to Adams National Historical Park. This historic park tells the story of four generations of the Adams family (from 1720 to 1927). It has two main sites: the birthplaces of second U.S. president John Adams and sixth U.S. president John Quincy Adams and Peacefield, including the “Old House,” home to four generations of the Adams family, and the Stone Library which contains more than 14,000 historic volumes. Limit: 15 people; fee: $10 (includes subway fare).