The American Association for History and Computing

AHA Staff, September 2004

The American Association for History and Computing (AAHC) held its annual meeting in January 2004 in conjunction with the AHA's annual meeting in Washington, D. C. Nine sessions dealing with all aspects of history and technology were held, many of which examined the application of technology to teaching. The keynote speaker at a reception sponsored by Muzzy Lane Software, Inc. was Orville Vernon Burton, recipient of the 2003 AHA's Eugene Asher Distinguished Teaching Award. Burton electrified the group with his talk, which was entitled "Keeping Up with the E-Joneses: History and Computers in the Twenty-first Century."

In addition to an annual conference, the AAHC publishes online the peer-reviewed Journal of the Association for History and Computing (JAHC), which can be seen at http://mcel.pacificu.edu/JAHC/JAHCindex.HTM . Submissions on any topic related to the use of computing in history, such as the application of computers to historical research, writing, teaching (at any level, including K-12) or disseminating historical knowledge are welcome. AAHC members also receive an electronic newsletter.

The AAHC in association with M.E. Sharpe, Inc. sponsors a book series "History, the Humanities and New Technology." Books in the series thus far include Digital Scholarship in the Tenure, Promotion, and Review Process, ed. Deborah Lines Andersen; Teaching History in the Digital Classroom, by D. Antonio Cantu; Wilson J. Warren; and Computers, Visualization and History: How New Technology Will Transform Our Understanding of the Past, by David J. Staley. Those interested in submitting book proposals for the series may contact the series editors: David J. Staley (david@dstaleygroup.com); Dennis Trinkle (dtrinkle@depauw.edu); or Jeffrey Barlow (barlowj@pacificu.edu).

The AAHC is particularly interested in helping administrators to better define, understand, and promote digital media that professionals produce in academic settings. Working with the Modern Language Association and the American Political Science Association, the AAHC developed Guidelines for Evaluating Digital Media Activities in Tenure, Review, and Promotion (available online at http://www.theaahc.org/tenure_guidelines.htm) to help institutions and departments adequately, fully, and fairly evaluate and reward those engaged in research and teaching with digital media. The AAHC is also working on issues such as the preservation of digital sources and the exploration of new forms of historical scholarship employing digital media. The next annual conference of the AAHC will be held April 15–17, 2005, at Roosevelt University in Schaumberg, Illinois. Details will be posted on the AAHC web site (www.theaahc.org) as they become available. For additional information on the association, visit the AAHC webpage at www.theaahc.org.